Round 8: Recursion

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(Curry’s Y combinator.)

Learning objectives

In this round you will learn ...

  • ... that recursion is one of the basic programming principles to organize computations and data
  • ... that the power of recursion stems from controlled self-reference that terminates at base cases
    • in essence, we can implement a large computation (or data structure) using smaller, self-similar, parts until the computation is so small so as to become trivial
  • ... that many familiar mathematical objects and functions benefit from a recursive definition
    • for example, a string of length \(n\) either (i) is empty (when \(n=0\), the base case), or (ii) consists of a first character followed by a string of length \(n-1\) (when \(n\geq 1\), the recursive case)
    • recursive definitions lead to simple recursive functions that manipulate data or carry out a computation
    • recursive definitions admit mathematical analysis via mathematical induction (*)
  • ... that recursion is naturally associated with a recursion tree that records all the stages of recursion
  • ... that recursion is a natural tool to carry out exhaustive search
  • ... how to use tail recursion to obtain efficiency

(Material that is marked with one or more asterisks (*) is good-to-know, but not critical to solving the exercises or passing the course.)

Recursion, recalled and extended

The goals of this round are

  • to recall the idea of recursion,
  • introduce ourselves to recursively defined data structures, and
  • learn how to solve problems recursively.

Athough we’ll review the basic idea of the recursion, you may want to first recall the material on recursion in the “Programming 1” course.

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